Tuesday, November 6, 2012

Paleo Coconut Bread (paleo; gluten/sugar/dairy free)

 

Dear Cave-Ladies and Gents, here I present you the most fuss-free Paleo Coconut Bread ever.
I have tested many recipes and tried and tried until I found the perfect mixture for a bread for a full on flavor, just enough moisture and crumbliness, suited for sweet and savory palate too.

This is my absolutely go-to recipe, because:
- it has only a handful of ingredients,
- the ingredients are cheap and easy to find, 
- needs only 5 min to prepare
and everyone LOVES it, so it WILL disappear in no time too. 

It is good in itself, with homemade marmalade, nut butter, Nutella, or 

...for the gluttonous as I am, with some butter and honey as my Grandma prepared it when I was young with a cup of hot cocoa or coffee (for grown-ups). 

Crazy good with some butter and honey....
I can honestly say without a hint of self-promotion here, that this bread (sweet or not) is hands down the best bread I have tasted - paleo or not! 

Well, as far as confession goes... I have never been a fan of bread. Never liked it. Ever. Until now. Because since I go this bread right, I have not wished for anything else to go beside my coffee in the mornings.





P.S.: I know I have disappeared, but think not that I haven't been baking every day. I have a bunch of recipes waiting to be translated and uploaded here and I am working on something special too for all the paleo food-lovers out there. In my defence: I have moved countried twice in this year, got married and right now living in Doha, Qatar. Right now, in this very moment I am listening to the beautiful call to prayer...


72 comments:

  1. That looks amazing - I never knew you could make a flour out of dried coconut flakes.

    Amazing!

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  2. how did cavemen make this?

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    1. I don't think that really matters since this isn't an historical re-enactment! If the macro-nutrient balance is acceptable, why not make this occasionally?

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    2. Good one Kara, haha! I personally don't believe in cavemen, but I love this diet.

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    3. This is amazing. You don't believe in cavemen?

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    4. Who cares how Cavemen made it. It 2013. How do we make it.

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    5. Can I use regular coconut flour instead of grinding actual coconut?

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  3. wow, beautiful recipe. Qatar? awesome!

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  4. Thank you Jenn!

    Kara, good question! :)

    Goddess Findings, thank you! Yes, I've just moved here. :)

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  5. Making this today! Quick question: I'm just going to use coconut flour pre-purchased - would it still be 3 cups? Or less because the yield of flour to 3 cups of flakes wouldn't be as much...?
    Thanks!

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    1. I think you should add 2.5 cups and see the texture. It must be very stiff and tick. I would try it that way and maybe adding some coconut oil in this case.

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  6. I made this over the weekend. Would love to repost my version of this on my blog. I will link back. Is that ok with you?

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    1. Yes, that's okay with me. Did you like it? :)

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    2. Oh yes! I loved it! As a matter of fact I made coconut French toast with it and it was the best French toast ever! Thanks for letting me link up! I will likely post sometime next or the week after. I am trying to time it right since we have a holiday coming up shortly. I found you on Pinterest in case you were wondering. :)

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    3. Oh, that's interesting to know, thank you for the information.
      I will check your blog for the post. :)
      I'm glad you liked it, I never tired as French toast but now I am going to try it for sure! Thank you!

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  7. I just posted the recipe tonight and placed a link back to this blog post. Hopefully, I can send some peeps your way. :) http://realfoodfreaks.com/2012/11/25/grain-free-coconut-bread/

    Also, here's the French toast recipe in case you wanted to try it: http://realfoodfreaks.com/2012/11/25/coconutty-french-toast-gf-df/

    Thanks again for the excellent idea!

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    1. I know this is an old comment, but I'd love to see your adaptation and the link doesn't work anymore. Can you share it if is in a new location?

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    2. I had to do a little digging around because it seems the blog has changed hands since Jen posted... or something! I don't know. But I was curious to and did a little backtracking to find the french toast recipe:

      3 eggs

      3/4 c coconut milk

      1 t vanilla

      1/2 t cinnamon

      pinch of sea salt

      ~1 cup coconut flakes

      coconut oil, raw for frying

      grain free coconut bread

      Procedure
      1) In a shallow bowl, beat eggs. Add in coconut milk, vanilla, cinnamon, and salt with the beaten eggs. Whisk ingredients together well.

      2) Place coconut flakes on a plate.

      3) Cut bread into 1/4 inch slices.

      4) Soak the bread in the egg mixture for about 5 minutes.

      5) Coat both sides of the soaked bread with coconut. Drizzle a little egg mixture on top and press so the coconut stays put.

      6) Melt some coconut oil in a pan. Fry the soaked bread on the first side until golden brown, then flip and fry the other side.

      7) Remove and serve immediately. Top with real maple syrup if desired.

      And the adaption of the bread here:

      What you’ll need:
      6 eggs

      1 teaspoon vanilla

      1 1/2 Tablespoon honey (the original recipe called for 3 T)

      1 teaspoon baking powder

      1/2 teaspoon cinnamon, not in the original recipe

      3 cups unsweetened DESSICATED coconut flakes, ground into flour with a food processor or coffee grinder

      1 teaspoon coconut oil, for oiling the bread pan

      Procedure
      Preheat oven to 285 degrees. Grind the coconut flakes into smaller pieces, but be careful not to over grind and make into coconut butter add baking powder to the ground coconut. In a separate bowl beat eggs then mix in vanilla, honey, cinnamon. Mix well. Slowly blend in the ground coconut/baking powder mix. Allow the coconut to start absorbing the liquid mixture (about 2 minutes or so).

      Line a bread pan with coconut oil. Fill the bread pan with batter. Bake at 285 degrees for 40-45 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean in the middle. Mine took about 45 minutes with a convection oven, so it might take a bit longer if you have a regular oven.

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  8. Looks lovely, so tasty! :)

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  9. This sounds super interesting! I love that it's a healthy baked good. I can't wait to give it a try. Bookmarked :)

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  10. I made this tonight! It was super delicious and even my picky toddler gobbled it up! Love it!

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    1. Michelle, I am very happy that you and your toddler liked it! :) Thank you for your feedback!

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  11. How is this for the paleo diet? There is no wheat/bread allowed in the paleo/caveman diet.

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    1. If you take a look at the recipe you will see that there is no wheat involved, since the 'flour' is made up by coconut.

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  12. So by using coconut flour, that still makes it Paleo right? Also, is the coconut flour you purchase, the same thing as the "flour" you'd make by grinding it? I wonder if it adds calories??

    Going to try and make it tonight!

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  13. What 's the texture and consistency of the batter supposed to look like?

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    1. It is much thicker, than a cake batter but not crumbly as a cookie.

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    2. I just made this and it was really crumbly and dry. Why would that be? Could the eggs be too small?

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  14. this looks great! but im having a hard time finding the coconut, is it supposed to be sweetened or unsweetened??

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    1. It is the simple, unsweetened, shredded coconut that you can find at any store.

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    2. Just for future reference, perhaps you live near some pretty high quality stores, but the majority of grocery stores do not carry unsweetened coconut. And I don't live in a deprived area without access to gluten-free items. It's just not common.

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  15. I made this bread and its good but my bread didnt turn brown or raise very well. Do you maybe know why? I followed the recipe. Thank you

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    1. It might have to do something with your oven temperature. Maybe you should try to bake it a bit higher or turn it up at the beginning and then turning it down when it has raised and browned.

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  17. What should the dough look like before cooking? Mine was very crumbly. If it's crumbly, am I supposed to press it down into the pan? I used your suggestion of 2.5 cups coconut flour (organic raw) and ended up having to add coconut milk to it. It was still super crumbly when I put it in the pan.

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    1. Dear Mary,

      the dough should not be as crumbly as a cookie dough, but should not be too liquid either, it is kind of in the middle of a cookie and a cake. More cakelike, but still you have to even the top with a spatula or knock the pan to the table 1-2 times to make it settle.
      The baked bread tends to be crumbly, yes, depending on the flour and baking time. So if you experience that it is too dry for your taste, you can always add some more coconut milk, but I rather like it on the more crumbly side.

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  18. I tried a bread very very similar to this, and the eggs separated during baking leaving me with a weird baked custard topped with coconut flour-zucchini topping (it was zucchini bread). Any thought or tips to prevent this again?

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    1. I have no solid idea about why that could happen. Maybe with the zucchini the case was that there was too much moisture, as zucchini is a type of vegetable that has a lot of water in it and while baking it gives the water out and maybe that was too much liquid along with the eggs.

      I have baked this bread for several times and never had an accident like that.

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  19. The recipe that you link to says X amount of baking powder/ bicarbonate soda my question is do you use both or one or the other?

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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    2. Dina, it is enough to use either baking powder or bicarbona soda, no need to use both. ( I mean "/" as "or")

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  20. The oven temp of 284* is unusual for us Americans. That seems really low. Our recipes typically call for 350* for breads. Does this bread not need a typical cooking temp? Thanks!

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    1. RossAnne, when I first tried baking it on 320 it rose and browned but in the middle it was still soft a bit (toothpick inserted wasn't clean) so I had to turn the heat down. If you like you can try it with your own on 320F but any higher I would not recommend, since it is not a usual bread, coconut does not react the same way as regular flour does. So yes, the temperature is not a mistake, it is deliberatley low.

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    2. Thank you! I'm excited to try it!

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  21. I just used regular coconut flour and I would start with a 1/2 cup and add to that if necessary. I used a full cup and had to add some coconut milk. Man that stuff soaks up some liquid! :)

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    1. Thank you for your comment, it was very helpful! :)

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  22. where to find a GMO free backing powder ? Most of them have corn starch, which I'm sure is GMO. What about if I'll use baking soda and apple cider vinegar. That should help rise the flour , right?

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    1. The brand I am using is Barkat, it's from the UK. Baking powder should not contain corn starch, for one because baking powder is made from (and can be made at home) sodium bicarbonate and tartaric acid, and secondly because corn starch - in my experience - does not help the dough to rise, but rider makes it ridige and give a thick texture.
      Of course you could as easily just use bicarbonate of soda. I would not use vinegar, for me bicarbonate of soda does the trick, and on the other hand this bread does not rise that far, it rises just moderately.
      Good luck with it, anyone tries it is usually hooked! :)

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  23. The crumb looks awesome on this bread. Almost like a moist pound cake! Can't wait to try this recipe. :)

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  24. I love the coconut flakes as a base! SO creative. Any idea of what I could use as a binder instead of eggs ( or bananas or dates)? We have food alleriges in the family. Id love your input. Thanks

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    Replies
    1. I think bananas are a great idea to use, and in that case I would bake it on low heat as to dry it, since in my experience vegan cakes using bananas as binding agent are big sticky. I think that would be a very good idea, give it a try and please tell me how it went!

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    2. You can use ground flax seed as a substitute for eggs. One tbsp ground flax mixed with 3 tbsp water, let it sit for about 5 minutes and then add it in. I've tried it with cookies and brownies with great success.

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  25. Sounds very simple and very delicious!

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  26. Can I use this for the coconut? I have the shredded kind. http://www.tropicaltraditions.com/organic_dried_coconut.htm

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  27. ok, so i'm a bit of a spaz! tried to make this but found the mixxture really dry and wasn't sure if it would hold together so added a bit of water (then a bit more), now it's really crumbly. should i cook it longer to dry it out? it tastes super yummy and i will def try again with out adding water!

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    1. also i used coconut flour, would that make a difference?

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    2. You can't use 3 cups of coconut flour in place of 3 cups of shredded coconut. They are not the same consistency at all. Coconut flour soaks up a lot of liquid compared to shredded coconut. Probably only 1 cup or so would be needed. Check the comments above.

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  28. This is by far my favorite paleo coconut bread recipe ever! I've tried many and though they were good, they were not as good as this one. Thank you for sharing!

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  29. Your pale coconut bread is too much yummy. I prepared it for my wife and she loves it. Your way of presenting is also too good.

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  30. I'm new to paleo- and was dying for something 'bread-like'. This is just wonderful! I tried it again shooting for a little less sweet and less eggy- so I made it with 4 eggs and 2 egg whites-added 1/4 c water to replace the moisture of the 2 yolks and instead of honey used an apricot jam. Did the trick :) Thanks so much for this

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  31. I absolutely love this recipe and for once I had a win with my oven which usually doesn't like to bake for me. Unfortunately or maybe fortunately for me, my kids weren't too fussed with the coconut texture but my husband and I really like it.

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  32. I have coconut flour. Can I use that instead of actual coconut flakes? If so, what measurement would you suggest?

    thanks!

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    1. As noted above in the comments it takes some trial and error. Start with 1/2 cup and work your way up from there until you get a really thick batter.

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  33. Has anyone tried adding a ripe banana to the batter? I'm guessing it would add a lot of flavor. But I'm not sure what impact it would have texture-wise.

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  34. The bread looks soft and delicious!! Definitely I'll make it for sure!! Thanks for sharing

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  35. Yummy! So delicious.. Thank you for sharing the recipe.

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  36. I just finished baking this bread! I love it! Thank you so much!!! Next time I will try to add 1/4 of a cup of coconut milk to see what it does to its texture.

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  37. Can this be made in a bread machine?

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  38. This is healthy and yummy! Will be preparing this for the fam!

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  39. It looks exquisite, however most Paleo people don't eat eggs, (one of the most common allergens,) so this is a NO go for me. But I wish I could!!!!!!

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    1. This is part of the definition of the Paleolithic diet : "The Paleolithic diet consists of foods that can be fished and hunted, such as seafood and meat (including offal), and foods that can be gathered, such as eggs, fruits, herbs, insects, mushrooms, nuts, seeds, spices, and vegetables"


      "Paleo people" as you call them absolutely do eat eggs. Not eating eggs because of an allergy is not the same thing as it not being "allowed." Walnuts are "allowed" but I'm allergic to tree nuts (which is a common allergy) that doesn't mean that all "paleo people" shouldn't eat walnuts, just because some are allergic.

      Sorry, I just don't like misinformation to be spread, it confuses people ;)

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